Book Study

The following selections are books that have been read by E21 representatives, along with their reflections. Hopefully, you will find something interesting to read here that will help you grow as an educator as you evolve your teaching into the 21st century. Click on the book cover to view the book online (author’s web site or Amazon Store).


More About the Book 21st CENTURY SKILLS: LEARNING FOR LIFE IN OUR TIMES
by Bernie Trilling and Charles Fadel 

“If you are looking for a great resource to explain the skills needed in the 21st century, this book fits the bill. Three categories are explored in the book: learning and motivation skills, digital literacy, and life and career skills. Through the use of many interesting examples, these skills provide a basic discussion of the topic. It also contains a historical perspective that shows how we have arrived at this need for balance and adjustments in teaching.The challenges that educators face today is the focus of this perspective. I can strongly recommend this book to anyone who wants an overview of the topic.”

~ D. Long, MS English/Drama, Spring 2012


CURRICULUM 21: ESSENTIAL ED FOR A CHANGING WORLD
edited by Heidi Hayes Jacobs

“This is a great book to analyze how schools and teachers are preparing their students for the future. I enjoyed this book because it takes a look at how to evaluate your school’s current curriculum and determine if the school should keep it, overhaul it, or just update it to fit the world our students live in today and will need to be prepared for in the future. All in all, I would recommend this book to others to read and investigate. Some ideas mentioned in the book may be a little radical for our setting but would keep us thinking about what more can we do for our students to help educate them with skills and content for the 21st century and beyond.”

~ M. Braggs, MS Social Studies, Spring 2012


More About the BookHAMLET’S BLACKBERRY
by William Powers 

“In Hamlet’s Blackberry, William Powers argues that we need a new digital philosophy that finds a balance between connecting outward and inward. His goal in this book is to explore ‘a practically useful way of thinking about technology, so it serves the full range of human needs, inside and out’ (100). Powers finds the answers to the challenges technology presents us by looking to figures of the past such as Socrates, Gutenberg, and Ben Franklin. He explores examples of past technologies and people’s reactions to them to shed light on things we should be considering as we learn to negotiate an ever changing digital world.”

~ R. Clemens, US English, Spring 2012


More About the Book

OUT OF OUR MINDS: LEARNING TO BE CREATIVE
by Ken Robinson 

“[This book] takes the reader on a journey exploring many aspects of creativity. Specific questions Robinson poses include: what is creativity, who has it (everyone), why is creativity more important than ever, how does education affect creativity, how can creativity be cultivated in students, and finally how do people become creative leaders. Along the way, Robinson’s vivid anecdotes keep the pace quick, varied, and always changing. Out of Our Minds is highly recommended for teachers seeking an often theoretical perspective on creativity inside and outside of the classroom.”

~ S. Pflaumer, US Physics, Spring 2012


More About the BookTRUTH, BEAUTY, AND GOODNESS REFRAMED
by Howard Gardner 

“Truth, beauty, and goodness are carefully described as defining virtues of civilization. The renowned education figure Howard Gardner explores the three and how we maintain these long standing virtues during this time of technological advancement. It is quite the approach towards the foundations of ethics in modern times. He explains how these concepts are changing faster than ever before, but it’s still possible and important for truth, beauty, and goodness to remain cornerstones of our society.”

~ S. Duty, Kindergarten, Spring 2012

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